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How did Tudor people have fun?

Enquiry

The child is invited to be a skilled artist in embroidery (no real embroidery skill is required!). After inspecting the Bradford table carpet, with its portrayal of various rural pastimes, the child has the task of finding out about urban leisure pastimes. These are suggested by a choice of objects and documentary sources. If these are successfully identified (see answers below in case of difficulties), an urban "table carpet" is prepared, which can then be coloured in online or printed out and coloured in by hand.

Question Answer
Carved panel
What pastime is shown here?
Music
Stained glass window
What pastime is shown here?
Dancing
Playing cards
Which pastime is shown here?
Cards
Letter from Thomas Bedingfield to Queen Elizabeth I
What pastime is mentioned here?
Bowling
Letter from Thomas Bedingfield to Queen Elizabeth I
What pastime is mentioned here?
Tennis
Section of a map of London
What pastime is shown here?
Bear Baiting

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Sources

  • The Bradford table carpet and other objects including Tudor playing cards and panels depicting leisure activities
  • A letter written to Queen Elizabeth I in 1592
  • A map made by Ralph Agas in 1559 showing a scene from the city of London

Learning

The focus is on knowledge of leisure activities in town and country as part of the National Curriculum requirement to study "the everyday lives of men, women and children from different sections of society".

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The Tudors – Teacher's notes

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